Resistant Starch - A good thing?



So what is a resistant starch? A Resistant starch is a carbohydrate that resists digestion in the small intestine and ferments in the large intestine.


Resistant starch is a very popular topic these days. Many people have experimented with it and seen major improvements by adding it to their diet.

Here are some food examples of resistant starch -


Plantains and green bananas (as a banana ripens the starch changes to a regular starch).

Beans (especially white beans and kidney beans) lentils, peas.

Cooked and cooled rice.


The amount of resistant starch changes with heat. Oats, green bananas, and plantains lose some of their resistant starch when cooked. Another type of resistant starch is made in the cooking and cooling process. Cooked rice that has been cooled is higher in resistant starch than rice that was cooked and not cooled.


Benefits -


1. It resists digestion, which means it shouldn't raise glucose levels . This in turn helps improve insulin sensitivity, lowers blood sugar levels and can reduce appetite.


2. Gut health is also improved as fermentation in the large intestine makes more good bacteria and less bad bacteria in the gut. Healthy gut bacteria can also improve glycemic control.

3. Resistant starch can increased the feeling of fullness so you don't over eat.

Tips on how to add these foods to your diet -

- Cook rice, potatoes, beans, and pasta a day in advance and cool in the refrigerator overnight. It’s ok to reheat the starch before eating. Reheating doesn’t decrease the amount of resistant starch.


- Try overnight oats - Soak your oats in milk, yogurt or nut milk over night.

- Add Bean & Lentils to your salads.

- Sprinkle - green banana, plantain or cassava flour on your meals.


SUMMARY

One of the main reasons why resistant starch improves health, is that it feeds the friendly bacteria in your intestine and increases the production of short-chain fatty acids like butyrate.


Trying to get you in the best possible shape with simple practical steps.


This blog is for guidance only and should be part of a balance diet


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